ZUZANA is a story of survival and triumph, of being pushed to the extreme ends of 

pushed to the edges existence 

a story of extremes of tests of survival, inner resolve, triumph and 

extreme tests of survival and inner resolve, triumph and endurance

 

A life of promise and talent against the backdrop of Nazi death camps, Communist suppression, Survival, Triumph

ZUZANA tells the gripping story of a young Czech musician caught up in the horrors of 20th century Europe, and how her passion for Bach drove her against all odds to become the world’s greatest harpsichordist of her time. Enduring Nazi death camps from the age of 15, Zuzana lived for decades behind the Iron Curtain under a totalitarian Communist regime. She refused to join the Communist Party and was deprived of basic freedoms and human rights as she refused to join the Party.

 

Recovering from a skeletal existence to claw back her talent in music, Zuzana traveled all over the world under strict supervision from the Czech Communist leaders, who confiscated her earnings and prize money as if she were one of their Olympic athletes. But they could not rob her of the international acclaim she earned for the beauty and power of her performances. During this time her husband Viktor Kalabis was forced to hold a menial job, while becoming one of the most revered Czech composers, creating works of music that the Communists would have banned had they understood their meaning. With liberation at the end of 1989, nineties, Zuzana and Viktor worked tirelessly to rebuild the broken spirit of their country, teaching and bringing music to people from every age group and walk of life. Now the music capital of Europe, Prague is a testament to the passion of Zuzana and Viktor, and how far the human spirit can go to triumph in the face of adversity.

 

ZUZANA tells the story of a young Czech musician caught up in the horrors of 20th century Europe, and how her passion for Bach - and a hundred miracles - drove her to map out a strategy for survival

 

drove her to

 

become one of the greatest musical performers of her time.

 

the world’s greatest harpsichordist of her time. Enduring Nazi death camps from the age of 15, Zuzana then lived for decades under the Communist regime, deprived of basic freedoms and human rights as she refused to join the Party. Recovering from a skeletal existence to claw back her talent in music, Zuzana traveled all over the world under strict supervision from the Czech Communist leaders, who confiscated her earnings and prize money as if she were one of their Olympic athletes. But they could not rob her of the international acclaim she earned for the beauty and power of her performances. During this time her husband Viktor Kalabis was forced to hold a menial job, while becoming one of the most revered Czech composers, creating works of music that the Communists would have banned had they understood their meaning. With liberation at the end of 1989, nineties, Zuzana and Viktor worked tirelessly to rebuild the broken spirit of their country, teaching and bringing music to people from every age group and walk of life. Now the music capital of Europe, Prague is a testament to the passion of Zuzana and Viktor, and how far the human spirit can go to triumph in the face of adversity.

tells the story of survival and triumph amidst all the horrors of horrors of 20th century Europe,   against tells the gripping and extraordinary story o

Zuzana Ruzickova describes her life as a hundred miracles and an onslaught of natural disasters. But she credits the music of J.S. Bach with saving her soul.

 

Imprisoned in four concentration camps by the Nazis from the age of 15, this is the story of grace and dignity in the face of unspeakable adversity. Emerging from Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen with hands so badly damaged from hard labour her musical future was deemed impossible by her teachers in Prague. But Zuzana persisted with her vision before the war, and went on to become the greatest virtuoso performer of Bach the world had seen for sixty years. Viewing her as a source of prestige and hard currency, the Czech Communist Party sent her all over the world to perform Bach on the harpsichord, confiscating her wages for the state, and forcing her to take mundane jobs at home because she refused to join the party.  

 

A relentless stream of 'natural disasters' and a hundred miracles describes the triumph and tragedy in the life of one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century, Zuzana Ruzickova. 

Zuzana describes her life as a hundred miracles and an onslaught of natural disasters. But she credits the music of J.S. Bach with saving her soul.

 

Imprisoned in four concentration camps by the Nazis from the age of 15, this is the story of grace and dignity in the face of unspeakable adversity. Emerging from Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen with hands so badly damaged from hard labour her musical future was deemed impossible by her teachers in Prague. But Zuzana persisted with her vision before the war, and went on to become the greatest virtuoso performer of Bach the world had seen for sixty years. Viewing her as a source of prestige and hard currency, the Czech Communist Party sent her all over the world to perform Bach on the harpsichord, confiscating her wages for the state, and forcing her to take mundane jobs at home because she refused to join the party.  

 

 

 

Letters from Baghdad tells the extraordinary and dramatic story of Gertrude Bell, the most powerful woman in the British Empire in her day. She shaped the modern Middle East after World War I in ways that still reverberate today. More influential than her friend and colleague Lawrence of Arabia, Bell helped draw the borders of Iraq and established the Iraq Museum. Why has she been written out of history?

Synopsis
Letters from Baghdad is the story of a true original—Gertrude Bell—sometimes called the “female” Lawrence of Arabia. Voiced and executive produced by Academy award winning actor Tilda Swinton, the film tells the dramatic story of this British spy, explorer and political powerhouse. Bell traveled widely in Arabia before being recruited by British military intelligence during WWI to help draw the borders of Iraq and as a result helped shape the modern Middle East. Using stunning, never-seen-before footage of the region, the film chronicles her extraordinary journey into both the uncharted Arabian desert and the inner sanctum of British colonial power. What makes the film stand apart is that the story is told entirely in the words of Gertrude Bell and her contemporaries, excerpted from their intimate letters, private diaries and official documents. It is a unique look at both a remarkable woman and the tangled history of Iraq. The film takes us into a past that is eerily current.